Last edited by Nall
Monday, May 4, 2020 | History

2 edition of Communicating with the elderly : shattering stereotypes found in the catalog.

Communicating with the elderly : shattering stereotypes

Vicki S Freimuth

Communicating with the elderly : shattering stereotypes

by Vicki S Freimuth

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Published by ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills in Urbana, Ill .
Written in English


Edition Notes

StatementVicki S. Freimuth, Kathleen Jamieson
SeriesTheory & research into practice
ContributionsJamieson, Kathleen M, ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Speech Communication Association
The Physical Object
Paginationvi, 38 p. ;
Number of Pages38
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14459520M

Of all the "isms" - ageism is slow to gain the awareness needed. In our youth obsessed culture, we still seem too tolerant of putting down people who are older. While there are some laws protecting those over 40 in employment, there is still a long way to go. Being aware is the first step. Elderspeak is a specialized speech style used by younger adults with older adults, characterized by simpler vocabulary and sentence structure, filler words, lexical fillers, overly-endearing terms, closed-ended questions, using the collective "we", repetition, and speaking more slowly. Elderspeak stems from the stereotype that older people have reduced cognitive abilities, such as in language.

The Harrowing is marketed as 'Scream meets The Exorcist' and I'd say that is a fair description. This is the debut novel of an author who's also a screenwriter, and it shows. This book reads like a movie; it's scary, jumpy, spine-chilling and keeps you on the edge of your seat/5(). Older adults are major consumers of health care. Within the context of an ageing society, their presence in the health care system will continue to grow. Ageist stereotypes and discrimination against older adults have an impact on the health and well-being of older citizens and are potential barriers to .

Practitioners working with older adults are encouraged to understand normal biological changes that accompany aging. Despite considerable individual differences, older adults almost inevitably experience changes in sensory acuity, physical appearance and body composition, hormone levels, peak performance capacity of most body organ systems, and. Understanding Age Stereotypes and Ageism A s we learned in Chapter 1, America has a graying population. Presently, seniors (people age 65 and older) make up 13% of the population. By , when the youngest members of the Baby Boomer generation reach retirement age, 19% of all Americans will be seniors (U.S. Census Bureau, ).


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Communicating with the elderly : shattering stereotypes by Vicki S Freimuth Download PDF EPUB FB2

Communicating with the Elderly: Shattering Stereotypes Paperback – January 1, See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions PriceManufacturer: Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills.

Communicating with the Elderly: Shattering Stereotypes. Designed to present communications problems faced by the elderly and to assist classroom teachers to develop activities for dealing with them, this booklet begins by examining stereotypes of older persons which minimize and distort communication with by: 2.

Communicating with the elderly: shattering stereotypes Author: Vicki S Freimuth ; Kathleen Jamieson ; ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills. SAGE Video Bringing teaching, learning and research to life.

SAGE Books The ultimate social sciences digital library. SAGE Reference The complete guide for your research journey. SAGE Navigator The essential social sciences literature review tool. SAGE Business Cases Real world cases at your fingertips.

CQ Press Your definitive resource for politics, policy and people. Communication With Older Adults The Influence of Age Stereotypes, Context, and Communicator Age include the relationship of positive stereotypes to communication with.

communication with older persons in models of age stereotyping and communication (N. Coupland, J. Coupland, & Giles, ; Hummert, May Lee Hummert is an associate professor in the Communication.

Effective communication requires you to tailor your message to your audience. When it comes to older adults, many of us tend to treat them like children, or invalids. Here are the most common. Infantilising or demeaning communication can make an older person feel of little value and without power.

Infantilising communication behaviour (as if to a child) includes ignoring, talking down, talking over, using baby talk, or being bossy.

Ask the question – “How do you feel when others are rude, critical or impatient eg bus. Tips for Improving Communication with Older Patients Good communication is an important part of the healing process.

Effective doctor-patient communication has research-proven benefits: Patients are more likely to adhere to treatment and have better outcomes, they express greater satisfaction with their treatment, and they are less likely to. Most of us wouldn't consider a woman of 41 to be old, but having beaten a year-old to land a spot on the team, Torres challenged stereotypes about aging and showed that people of all ages are.

The term ageism has been used to describe an important barrier to good communication between health care providers and older patients. 37 This type of bias may lead to communication that is characterized by stereotyped expectations rather than the recognition of highly variable individual characteristics of older patients.

It is also associated with interaction patterns in which the physician. For this reason, he offers these stories not as a social science survey, but as “testimonios” — a new narrative to combat the kind of stereotypes into which Latinos are often confined: the poorly-educated, low-skilled, oftentimes criminal individuals who don’t assimilate into the greater community.

Politeness Principle in Cross-Culture Communication Yongliang Huang Foreign Languages Department, Xianyang Normal University, XianyangChina Tel: E-mail: [email protected] The project was supported by the Science Foundation of. There are many myths surrounding dementia, some of which you’ll find here. Once you understand the myths, you’ll be better able to face the reality of dementia with the facts.

Myth: Because someone in my family has dementia, I am going to get it. Reality: While genetics do play a role in the development of some forms of dementia, the majority of cases do not have a strong, known genetic link. The purpose of this review is to present findings on the effects of stereotypes of aging on health outcomes related to older adults, such as physical and mental functioning (specifically) and overall well-being and perceived quality of life (more broadly).

This review shows that both positive and negative stereotypes of aging can have enabling and constraining effects on the actions. Stereotypes about race, gender, sexual orientation, age, and other personal characteristics shape how people perceive, interact with, and make decisions about others.

For decades, the way groups of people have been portrayed by the media, popular culture, and public officials has led to biases—often unconscious—that can result in discrimination against women and people of color.

But tablets, e-book readers, and smartphones are each owned by an identical 18% of older adults. In fact, the proportion of older adults who own either a tablet or an e-book reader is actually larger than the proportion owning a smartphone. Some 27% of seniors own a tablet, an e-book reader, or both, while 18% own a smartphone.

Reaching and Engaging with Hispanic Communities: A Research-Informed Communication Guide for Nonproffts, Policymakers, and Funders About the Authors Alicia Torres is a senior director of communications and Hispanic outreach at Child Trends.

She has more. Communicating with Children: Introduction viii Communication for Development (C4D) strategies promote behaviour and social change that are particularly relevant, and in many cases, essential to development programmes as they seek the achievement of the MDGs and the broader realization of the rights of children and women.

The Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) just turned 50—but age stereotypes in the workplace abound. Experts say that organizations need to move beyond outdated labels and embrace the. Shattering stereotypes Feature Stories Shattering stereotypes Older students use Tutu Tuesday as a jumping-off point for deeper conversations about how the binary gender model fails people whose gender doesn’t match the one assigned them at birth and excludes people who experience their gender as something more than just “boy” or.

Managers face many difficult challenges in the workplace, but one obstacle that often is overlooked is the need to communicate with up to four different generations in a single office setting.

The results elucidate some of the reasons behind older adults’ attitudes toward technology, provide insight into how people define the constructs in technology acceptance models, and can enable designers to better meet older adults’ needs and preferences.

Stereotypes suggest that older adults are unable, unwilling, or afraid to use technology.